Why I care about Ethical Fashion?

Who Made My Clothes | ethicalfair.com
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Ignorance is bliss. Even ignorance underpinned by a gnawing suspicion that the bargain you’re about to bag has to have a catch. Well it does, it has one hell of a catch. And that gnawing suspicion is now a terrifying reality. Back in the 80s, growing up in Ireland, money wasn’t plentiful. The Christmas trip to Primark for new pyjamas and “Christmas clothes” was an event and school uniforms were purchased on layaway. Events like weddings required months of budgeting to afford the requisite hat as well as outfits for the kids. The gnawing suspicion was there. People were vaguely aware of sweatshops but I think there was an underlying assumption that people were inherently good and decent. If kids were being used in factories, surely it wasn’t that many. And if women were being forced to work long hours, wasn’t it better than being in the sex trade. People were blissfully unaware of how bad things really were. Fast forward to 2015 and it’s a very different story. We have the facts and a simple google search places the ugly truth right in front of us. In fact, we don’t even need to actively seek this truth – after […]


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Not Easy Being Green

Kermit | ethicalfair.com | (c) Disney No infringement intended
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Sometimes the sheer number of touch points where a product can let the ethical consumer down overwhelms me. The list is endless and it can make a regular person, usually intention-rich but time-poor, throw their hands up in despair.


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Sweatshop. Deadly Fashion: A Documentary

Deadly Fashion Screencap | ethicalfair.com
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This is a great documentary about life in a sweatshop for anybody wondering if the inconvenience of avoiding fast fashion is really worth it. I don’t know about you, but after watching this the “sacrifices” I make seem a little trivial! Over the series we see the breaking down of the participant’s somewhat relaxed attitudes towards sweatshops and forced labour. The usual attitudes of “lucky to have a job” and “at least not a prostitute” are quite quickly eroded once the reality sets in. The film is made all the more powerful by their realisation that the nameless, faceless people they rely on for their fashion are just like them.


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